Bright Wall/Dark Room is currently accepting submissions for our monthly online magazine. Each issue is built around a particular theme, and we open up the submission process for each new issue 1-2 months in advance of the submission deadline. We are also now accepting general pitches and submissions (off-theme) for consideration. 

We’re looking for thoughtful analysis and wholehearted engagement, as opposed to standard reviews, clickbait, or hot takes. We publish interviews, profiles, formal analysis, cultural criticism, personal essays, and humor pieces. We're looking for writing that is savvy and insightful about filmmaking, but that also grapples in some way with the business of being alive. 

We tend to publish critical essays between 1500-3000 words, though we’ve certainly been known to publish pieces in other, longer formats. Creative approaches are always encouraged.

 

Ends on June 6, 2018

The theme for Bright Wall/Dark Room’s July issue is HEAT. We’re looking for writing about film and television that hews to this theme in some way*. 

Some directions you could take this in: 

Literally Sweaty Movies: Movies where the characters are constantly fanning themselves, wiping their brows, pouring sweating glasses of iced tea, emotions running high and wild nonetheless. Do the Right ThingBarton Fink, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Twelve Angry Men, Stray Dog, Drunken Angel, Night of the Iguana, Dog Day Afternoon, Blood Simple, Wild at Heart, A Streetcar Named Desire, Mississippi Burning, A Time to Kill, Y Tu Mama TambienBody Heat

Lush Heat: Movies that feel warm and green and languorous. 

Cuaron’s Great ExpectationsApocalypse Now, The Spectacular Now

Arid Heat: The sun is oppressive, the water is scarce. The Mad Maxes, Chinatown, The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly, There Will be Blood, Full Metal Jacket, Good Time, Holes, The Searchers, Lawrence of Arabia, American Honey

Hot Scenes: Riffs, analyses, and reveries on particular scenes that exemplify heat. 

The Aesthetics of Heat: Films or directors or performers who exemplify a “hot” aesthetic. 

Great Sweaty Performances: Bruce Willis in Die Hard, Sigourney Weaver in Alien(s)

*It’s important to note that we’re not looking for every essay here to be about the role of heat in the film—if the movie is self-evidently hot in some way, you can take your piece in whatever direction seems right. 

As always, we’re looking for thoughtful analysis and wholehearted engagement, as opposed to standard reviews, clickbait, or hot takes. We publish interviews, profiles, formal analysis, cultural criticism, personal essays, and humor pieces. We looking for writing that is savvy and insightful about filmmaking, but that also grapples in some way with business of being alive.

We tend to publish critical essays between 1800-3000 words, though we’ve certainly been known to publish pieces in other, longer formats. Creative approaches are always encouraged.

In order to be considered for the issue, we’ll need to receive a first draft of your essay by June 6, 2018.

If you haven’t written for us before and want to know more about the submission process, or if you have a few different ideas and aren’t sure which one to pursue, please feel free to email the editorial team (editors@brightwalldarkroom.com) prior to the submission deadline with any pitches or questions. Please consult our site for more information: http://brightwalldarkroom.com/submissions/

We welcome unsolicited essay submissions of any length, on any film or television related topic. If you'd like to submit a pitch or an essay to our editorial team, this is the place to do it. However, before you submit your piece, we recommend that you read our current issue online, or browse through our archives a bit, to get a sense of the kinds of things we tend to publish.

Please note: due to the number of submissions we receive, we aren't always able to respond to every single pitch or submission. However, if we are interested in your pitch or submission, you will be contacted within one month.