Bright Wall/Dark Room is currently accepting submissions for our monthly online magazine. Each issue is built around a particular theme, and we open up the submission process for each new issue 1-2 months in advance of the submission deadline. We are also now accepting general pitches and submissions (off-theme) for consideration. 

We’re looking for thoughtful analysis and wholehearted engagement, as opposed to standard reviews, clickbait, or hot takes. We publish interviews, profiles, formal analysis, cultural criticism, personal essays, and humor pieces. We're looking for writing that is savvy and insightful about filmmaking, but that also grapples in some way with the business of being alive. 

We tend to publish critical essays between 1500-3000 words, though we’ve certainly been known to publish pieces in other, longer formats. Creative approaches are always encouraged.

 

For our March issue we'll be looking back a quarter century (feel old yet?) at the films of 1994.

More detailed prompt coming soon...

Ends on December 28, 2018

“Time is the longest distance between two places.” - Tom Wingfield in The Glass Menagerie

The theme for our February issue is TIME, and we’re looking for writing about film and television that considers, in some way, the medium’s unique ability to explore the passage of time.

There are many directions you could take this, but a few ideas to get you started:

How Time Changes…

  • People: The Searchers; The Life & Death of Colonel Blimp; There Will Be Blood; Youth Without Youth; The Tree of Life—if a story starts with a young protagonist, and finishes near the end of their life? Congratulations, you’ve made us cry.
  • Places: San Francisco in Zodiac; Texas in Giant; Earth’s past(s), present, and future(s) in Cloud Atlas; the known universe in 2001: A Space Odyssey…
  • Relationships: The Way We Were; The Notebook; Brokeback Mountain; the intergenerational relationships in the films of Yasujirō Ozu…

Experiments with Temporality: projects shot over long periods (the Up series; the Before trilogy; Boyhood); stories taking place in real time (12 Angry Men; Cleo from 5 to 7; Carnage); works that force the audience to consider the time passing around them (so-called “slow cinema” like The Turin Horse or Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives; the meditative swimming pool sequence in Tarkovsky’s Nostalghia; Andy Warhol’s Empire)

Movies Where Time Doesn’t Travel in a Straight Line: About Time; Je t’aime, je t’aime; the Back to the Future trilogy; Groundhog Day—sometimes it’s the fracturing of time that changes characters the most.

Broader Considerations: Why does it so rarely work to have actors play “old”? How did the passage of time change your perspective on a movie? 

As always, we’re looking for thoughtful analysis and wholehearted engagement, as opposed to standard reviews, clickbait, or hot takes. We publish interviews, profiles, formal analysis, cultural criticism, personal essays, and humor pieces. We're looking for writing that is savvy and insightful about filmmaking, but that also grapples in some way with the business of being alive. 

We tend to publish critical essays between 1800-3000 words, though we’ve certainly been known to publish pieces in other, longer formats. Creative approaches are always encouraged. 

We pay $50 per essay upon publication.

In order to be considered for the issue we’ll need to receive a first draft of your essay by December 28, 2018.

If you haven’t written for us before and want to know more about the submission process, or if you have a few different ideas and aren’t sure which one to pursue, please feel free to email the editorial team (editors@brightwalldarkroom.com) prior to the submission deadline with any pitches or questions. Also, before submitting, please check our archives to make sure we haven't covered the film you hope to write about within the last calendar year (we even have an alphabetized database of every film we've covered under the "Films" tab for extra convenience). 

For additional information, visit our Submissions page: http://brightwalldarkroom.com/submissions/

Ends in 5 days, 2 hours

The theme for our January issue is THE BEST OF 2018, and we’re looking for writing about film and/or television that celebrates all the amazing stories this year had to offer!

Of course there are so many directions you could take this, but a few ideas to get you started...

Turn a Critical Eye on the Year’s Best Work!

From the blockbuster hits (Black Panther; Crazy Rich Asians; A Star is Born) to the underseen gems (The Miseducation of Cameron Post; Lean On Pete; Blindspotting)...from documentaries (Won’t You Be My Neighbor?; Three Identical Strangers; Minding the Gap) to international fare (Burning; Let the Sunshine In; Roma)...from genre play (the Western revisionism of The Sisters Brothers and The Ballad of Buster Scruggs; the form-breaking big budget thrills of Widows and A Quiet Place) to comedy (the biting satire of Sorry to Bother You and The Death of Stalin; the Netflix romcom renaissance of Set It Up and To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before)...and of course it’s peak TV out there so we’d love to read about Killing Eve, Barry, Atlanta, and everything else we keep swearing we’ll catch up on...all that matters is what had the biggest impact on you this year, not the critical consensus.

Deep Dives on Specific Scenes

There’s Eighth Grade’s pool party from Hell; there’s Paddington 2’s song and dance finale; there’s Mandy’s hallucinatory chainsaw duel; there’s The Old Man and the Gun’s car chase set to “Blues Run the Game.” Sometimes that one perfect sequence is worth about a thousand words…

Personal Reflections

Did Support the Girls trigger memories of food service jobs past? Did First Reformed provoke new contemplations on your faith? Did Hearts Beat Loud make you want to call your dad? Provided the memoir doesn’t overwhelm the movie, we’re always interested in where you saw yourself reflected onscreen!

(Please bear in mind that we’ve already published essays this year on Annihilation (twice, actually) Hereditary, You Were Never Really Here, and Sharp Objects. That’s not to say we won’t consider another, just that it would need to take a significantly different angle on the film, so be sure to peruse those essays as you brainstorm your own!)

As always, we’re looking for thoughtful analysis and wholehearted engagement, as opposed to standard reviews, clickbait, or hot takes. We publish interviews, profiles, formal analysis, cultural criticism, personal essays, and humor pieces. We're looking for writing that is savvy and insightful about filmmaking, but that also grapples in some way with the business of being alive. 

We tend to publish critical essays between 1800-3000 words, though we’ve certainly been known to publish pieces in other, longer formats. Creative approaches are always encouraged.  

In order to be considered for the issue we’ll need to receive a first draft of your essay by December 15, 2018.

If you haven’t written for us before and want to know more about the submission process, or if you have a few different ideas and aren’t sure which one to pursue, please feel free to email the editorial team (editors@brightwalldarkroom.com) prior to the submission deadline with any pitches or questions. Also, before submitting, please check our archives to make sure we haven't covered the film you hope to write about within the last calendar year (we even have an alphabetized database of every film we've covered under the "Films" tab for extra convenience). 

For additional information, visit our Submissions page: http://brightwalldarkroom.com/submissions/

We welcome unsolicited essay submissions of any length, on any film or television related topic. If you'd like to submit a pitch or an essay to our editorial team, this is the place to do it. However, before you submit your piece, we recommend that you read our current issue online, or browse through our archives a bit, to get a sense of the kinds of things we tend to publish.

Please note: due to the number of submissions we receive, we aren't always able to respond to every single pitch or submission. However, if we are interested in your pitch or submission, you will be contacted within one month.

 

 

Bright Wall/Dark Room