Bright Wall/Dark Room is currently accepting submissions for our monthly online magazine. Each issue is built around a particular theme, and we open up the submission process for each new issue 1-2 months in advance of the submission deadline. We are also now accepting general pitches and submissions (off-theme) for consideration. 

We’re looking for thoughtful analysis and wholehearted engagement, as opposed to standard reviews, clickbait, or hot takes. We publish interviews, profiles, formal analysis, cultural criticism, personal essays, and humor pieces. We're looking for writing that is savvy and insightful about filmmaking, but that also grapples in some way with the business of being alive. 

We tend to publish critical essays between 1500-3000 words, though we’ve certainly been known to publish pieces in other, longer formats. Creative approaches are always encouraged.

 

As the old saying goes, “It takes two to make a thing go right/It takes two to make it out of sight,” and for our March issue, we’re looking for thoughtful essays on cinematic pairings of all kinds, including but not limited to these jumping-off points…

  • Fictional stories of friends (Thelma and Louise, Frances and Sophie, Harold and Kumar), and foes (Neil and Vincent in Heat, Lady Sarah and Abigail in The Favourite, Salieri and Mozart in Amadeus), siblings (the Hudsons in Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?, the Prescotts in You Can Count on Me, the Mantles in Dead Ringers), uneasy allies (Clarice Starling and Hannibal Lecter, Madeline and Helen in Death Becomes Her, Rocky Balboa and Apollo Creed), and mentors (Mr. Miyagi and Daniel in The Karate Kid, Sean and Will in Good Will Hunting, Eddie Felson and Vincent Lauria in The Color of Money). Please note that while we’re certainly open to essays on romantic couples, that sort of pairing could easily be (and has previously been) the focus of a whole issue, so unless they have additional significance mentioned below, maybe look towards other types first.
  • Noteworthy on-screen pairings from frequent on-screen romantic partners (Hanks and Ryan, Astaire and Rogers, Bogart and Bacall, Tracy and Hepburn), performers whose roles together form a significant element of their legacies (Newman and Redford, Frost and Pegg, Pryor and Wilder, Lemmon and Matthau) real-life siblings who’ve frequently shared the screen (Shawn and Marlon Wayans, John and Joan Cusack), and real-life couples whose rocky relationships can be traced on-screen (Kidman and Cruise, Taylor and Burton)
  • Significant behind-the-scenes pairings, be it director and performer (Ryan Coogler and Michael B. Jordan, Pedro Almodóvar and Penélope Cruz) or purely behind-the-camera (Martin Scorsese and Thelma Schoonmaker, Spike Lee and Terence Blanchard)

We recently created a brand-new guide to pitching and submitting, so please take a few minutes to consult that if you haven't already. In the meantime, as always, we’re looking for thoughtful analysis and wholehearted engagement, as opposed to standard reviews, clickbait, or hot takes. We’re a home for film writing that you won’t find anywhere else on the web—we’re not afraid to go long, to dive deep, to look close, to dig into filmmaking and film theory, but also to get messy and vulnerable and human, to explore nuance and mystery. We’re looking for writing that is savvy and insightful about filmmaking, but that also grapples in some way with the business of being alive.

We tend to publish critical essays between 2000 - 4000 words, though we’ve certainly been known to publish pieces in other, longer formats. Creative approaches are always encouraged!

We pay $100 per essay upon publication. Please be aware that our acceptances are based on the presumption of the writer's good-faith engagement with our collaborative editorial process; a refusal to participate in this process may result in rescinded acceptance.

In order to be considered for the issue we’ll need to receive a complete first draft of your essay via Submittable by February 9, 2021.

Please be advised that we love publishing new and undiscovered voices, but that given the high volume of interest and few available publishing slots, we ask that writers without significant portfolios submit a full first draft rather than sending pitches for consideration. Writers with professional experience in longform writing are more likely to have a piece approved based on a pitch, and can feel free to contact editors@brightwalldarkroom.com. Also, before submitting, please check our archives to make sure we haven't covered the film you hope to write about within the last calendar year (we even have an alphabetized database of every film we've covered under the "Films" tab for extra convenience).

For additional information, visit our Submissions page: http://brightwalldarkroom.com/submissions/.

We welcome unsolicited essay submissions of any length on any film or television related topic. However, before you submit your piece, we recommend that you visit our "About" page and browse our archives to get a sense of the sort of pieces we publish—longform works of thoughtful analysis on the relationship between movies and the business of being alive.

We pay $100 per essay upon publication.

Unfortunately, due to the high volume of submissions and few available slots for off-theme essays, we can only respond to submissions that we are interested in publishing. If you have not heard back within 2 weeks, please accept our appreciation for sharing your work but our regrets that we will be unable to publish it.

Please be advised that we love publishing new and undiscovered voices, but that given the high volume of interest and few available publishing slots, we ask that writers without significant portfolios submit a full first draft rather than sending pitches for consideration. Writers with professional experience in longform writing are more likely to have a piece approved based on a pitch, and can feel free to contact editors@brightwalldarkroom.com

Bright Wall/Dark Room