Bright Wall/Dark Room is currently accepting submissions for our monthly online magazine. Each issue is built around a particular theme, and we open up the submission process for each new issue 1-2 months in advance of the submission deadline. We are also now accepting general pitches and submissions (off-theme) for consideration. 

We’re looking for thoughtful analysis and wholehearted engagement, as opposed to standard reviews, clickbait, or hot takes. We publish interviews, profiles, formal analysis, cultural criticism, personal essays, and humor pieces. We're looking for writing that is savvy and insightful about filmmaking, but that also grapples in some way with the business of being alive. 

We tend to publish critical essays between 1500-3000 words, though we’ve certainly been known to publish pieces in other, longer formats. Creative approaches are always encouraged.

 

Ends on July 6, 2018

The theme for our August issue is BODY. We’re looking for writing about film and television that hews to this theme in some way. 

Some directions you could take this in: 

The Body as Cinematic Subject: Black Swan, The Wrestler, Ghost in the ShellUnder the Skin, The Machinist. The Girlfriend Experience, Red Sparrow, Swiss Army Man, Million Dollar Baby

Body Horror: The Fly, Videodrome, basically any werewolf movie, Hostel, SawTeeth, Tetsuo: The Iron Man, Alien, The Thing, Dead Ringers, Altered States, Possession.

Body-Centric Comedies: Comedies that play fast and loose with the notion of the human body. Big, Splash, Freaky Friday, Vice Versa, All of Me, Warm Bodies, Weekend at Bernie's, 13 Going on 30, 17 Again, the Honey, I Shrunk franchise, Heaven Can Wait—and pretty much any body swap movie.

The Body in the Contexts of Illness and Disability: Pieces exploring films that engage with physical illness and/or disability. (We're particularly interested in the perspective of writers who have dealt with these subjects firsthand. Pieces can praise films that explore these themes well, but we're also interested in pieces about the ways that film and television get these things wrong). Ex: The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, My Left Foot, Breaking the WavesAmour, The Sessions, Rust and Bone, The Best Years of Our Lives, Born on the Fourth of July, The Elephant Man.

Cinematic Bodies: Pieces analyzing the physical acting or the body-as-object-of-gaze of particular actors; if you go this route, be respectfully analytical and not skeevy, please.

Movies that are Way Too On the Nose for This Theme: The Fantastic Voyage, Innerspace, Osmosis Jones (For advanced players.)

As always, we’re looking for thoughtful analysis and wholehearted engagement, as opposed to standard reviews, clickbait, or hot takes. We publish interviews, profiles, formal analysis, cultural criticism, personal essays, and humor pieces. We looking for writing that is savvy and insightful about filmmaking, but that also grapples in some way with business of being alive.

We tend to publish critical essays between 1800-3000 words, though we’ve certainly been known to publish pieces in other, longer formats. Creative approaches are always encouraged. 

In order to be considered for the issue, we’ll need to receive a first draft of your essay by July 6, 2018.

If you haven’t written for us before and want to know more about the submission process, or if you have a few different ideas and aren’t sure which one to pursue, please feel free to email the editorial team (editors@brightwalldarkroom.com) prior to the submission deadline with any pitches or questions. Also, before submitting, please check our archives to make sure we haven't covered the film you hope to write about within the last calendar year (a simple search of the film's title on our site should give you this information). 

For additional information, visit our Submissions page: http://brightwalldarkroom.com/submissions/

We welcome unsolicited essay submissions of any length, on any film or television related topic. If you'd like to submit a pitch or an essay to our editorial team, this is the place to do it. However, before you submit your piece, we recommend that you read our current issue online, or browse through our archives a bit, to get a sense of the kinds of things we tend to publish.

Please note: due to the number of submissions we receive, we aren't always able to respond to every single pitch or submission. However, if we are interested in your pitch or submission, you will be contacted within one month.